Saltar para: Posts [1], Pesquisa [2]

Espacillimité

NADIR AFONSO - laurafonso@sapo.pt

Espacillimité

NADIR AFONSO - laurafonso@sapo.pt

20
Set08

Nature of/in Art

Laura Afonso

Paula Monteiro

 
In Revista «Villas & Golfe», Junho/Julho de 2008
 
 
Ever since the red circle he painted, at the age of four, on the white wall of his parent´s house, Nadir Afonso suspected, and now feels and knows, that the essence of a work of art lies in geometry, in mathematical laws. When an artist paints, Afonso explains, he «depicts these mathematical   laws in nature, although he is not aware of this». His career – as impressive for the works of art created as it is analyzable, in the many books in which he expounds his theory on artistic creation – is littered with many experimentations, as art is a « quest made through experimenting». Architect by chance, inevitably and intrinsically a painter, Nadir Afonso continues on his search for harmony, this law that governs art, inhabitant of irreplaceable and indestructible mathematical laws of geometry. As these laws are natural and cosmological, the core of nature is reached through geometry, revealing art, according to the Nadir Afonso, «the relationship between the law and the object».
With four you painted a circle on your parents’ living room wall. What caused you, do you think, to paint this geometric shape, geometry that has marked your subsequent paintings?
I was four years old, it was something unpremeditated. If there is any relationship with my subsequent work, I wouldn’t be able to explain it. I thought that it was a pretty and interesting shape- the red circle stood out on the white wall. But it was nothing more than this. The reflection comes now. And perhaps it has come to a conclusion – there had to be, subconsciously, an attraction, unfelt at the time, for geometric figures.
You have said: «a canvas ponders certain laws, laws of composition, laws that lie in mathematics and these laws are unchangeable». What laws are you referring to?
They are laws of mathematics. The laws of mathematics are unchangeable: 2 + 2= 4 everywhere. Even if a circle or a square had never existed, the law itself exists, it is pre-existent. Man has been attracted by this geometry, a latent geometry. The laws of the circle, of the square, of the tetrahedron, all of this are irreplaceable and exist even if the object has never existed.
And a painter tries to depict these laws through painting?
He tries to, even though he is not aware of this. And normally he is not aware of it. The artist says: «I have nothing to do with geometry. I express my inner world in my art». This is wrong. The artist thinks that he is expressing his inner world in his work, when what he is doing is searching for laws present in nature. He expresses these laws because he senses them without understanding them.
You could therefore say that art is an equation that n to be developed mentally, the solution of which is not necessarily to be found in the visual world?
 
It is not visible. Geometry' is a not an utterable phenomenon. 1 cannot define the laws of art work, or the laws of the cosmos, but 1 can feel them. I insist on this because it is very important: the artist employs these laws because he feels them, but he doesn’t understand them. And therefore we see artists who disagree with me and aesthetes even more so. Because things are not medita­ted, they do not reach the level of consciousness. They pass to the level on institution and not of consciousness.
 
Your experience with the red circle on the living room wall and subsequent development seemed to dictate that you would study fine art. What happened for you enroll in ­architecture instead?
 
I went for architecture because it was requested by outside. forces. When I arrived at the School of Fine Arts of Oporto, I ­brought with me an application form to enroll on the painting course. But when l entered the school, I was met by a clerk, dozing behind his desk. I told him that I wanted to enroll on the painting course. He tugged at my application and said: «Oh man, so you graduated from secondary school and you’re going to sign up for painting?! You're going to do architecture! » Back then, 60 or so years ­ago, it was unthinkable for anyone with a full school education to study painting, as you only need to have studied primary ­school level to get onto this course.
Out of cowardice, and at just 18, I tore up my painting course application and filled out another for architecture. And so I studied architecture, prompted solely by the opinion
of this clerk. But I made a mistake, because 1 was only' a painter. I was never an architect. I took the course, but I never felt 1ike an architect.
 
Do you still believe that architecture is not an art, as you did when you wrote your final thesis?
I have always tried to understand the laws governing art and the laws governing architecture. The laws governing art are the laws of harmony, the mathematical laws of geometry. Architecture does not need to attend to these laws; it is a discipline in search of functionality. A good architect does not chase after laws of harmony, rather the laws of perfection, which are the laws of nature, like those of harmony, but which have a different source. 
 
But what distinction do you make then between har­mony and perfection?
These qualities both lie in nature - the spirit of man does nothing more than learn these qualities. Harmony is sourced in mathematics; it does not obey any law of functionality.
If the object, through its function, responds to the laws of perfection, this is not related to the laws of harmony. Perfection is the qua­lity of the object whose function responds to the need of the subject. The artist searches for these laws of harmony. When a painter paints he follows the laws of harmony.
 
Despite your choice of architecture being the result of casual selection and not being happy with your choice, you were still good enough to have worked with Le Corbusier and Oscar Niemeyer. How did this come about?
It was purely a social coincidence. I was in Paris for a while, attracted by the harmony of forms, by art. But then I needed to work, I had to do architecture. I was already a qualified architect and I needed to work, to earn money and so I practiced architecture for many years. I decided to knock on Le Corbusier's door, as I thought it would be more interesting, as he was also a painter. This was one of the factors that led me to choose Le Corbusier. With regards to Oscar Niemeyer, I also worked there by chance, and the fact that I had worked with Le Corbusier helped me to Work in Niemeyer's studio. But these are matters of a social na­ture, of the need for survival, that have nothing to do with my am­bition to paint.
 
Your aesthetic development, beginning with the fascina­tion with all things geometric with the red circ1e, passed then through expressionism, through surrealism, through human figuration, especially the female form, through kine­tic art, before returning almost to the beginning, with geo­metric abstractionism. What lies behind this trajectory?
This all happens a little subconsciously. A person is influen­ced. At a certain moment I was attracted to the painting of Max Ernst. At times I was led to search for this, or for that. For exam­ple, when I saw the paintings of Victor Vasarely I thought: «this is what art is all about». I also spent some time searching for pu­re geometry. There are things that we learn little by little. At the start of my career as a painter I didn't think as I did latter or as I do today, that the essence of art lies in mathematics. Initially I thought that the preference of the artist for the perfection of objects lies in art. Only much later on did I come to the conclusion that perfection had nothing to do with art - I can make imperfection and make art. It was a slow, hard work, lasting many years that led me to the conclusion that the essence of art work lies in mathematics. Deep down this is what art is all about - a person hunts all around, looking for things, experimenting with them.
 
Besides your paintings, you have written many books in which you explain the characteristics of artistic creation. What determines this creation? Why does the artist manages to capture these pure forms, albeit unconsciously?
Artists need to work many years before they start to understand these laws. Working forms, man is working through them. As he works, the artist senses little by little the harmony existing in forms and then uses this harmony in his work. And I’ll tell you
something odd. I am now 87. I am much more decrepit than I was 50 years ago, 30 years ago and even 10 years ago. I am no longer the same man. I find it difficult to understand certain things. But my sensitivity to the harmony of forms is more alert now than it was before. The sensitivity has grown.
Sometimes 1 come across a painting of mine that 1 haven't seen for 50 years, and 1 look at it and feel that the painting is wrong in a certain place. But is it wrong, or isn’t it? I feel that the painting is missing a square, for example, but is the square there or not? I'm not sure.
If we make a calculation, like 2 + 2 = 4, the 4 doesn't need to be there. The parity, in itself, i.e. the 2 + 2, already gives me the 4. It’s the same thing in the painting. A square here, another trian­gle there - the balance in the painting itself, with these real sha­pes, gives me the certainty that in a certain place something is missing, which I'm not sure is there or is not there, but which is the sum of the whole that is there - 1 feel the law. If I possessed the ability to learn the law through concrete form, I could see a real shape sensing the law. There is a phenomenon in nature of which philosophy is unaware: the law can show us the object without the object being there. That which exists in nature has been ge­nerated by laws at the point at which the law itself generated the object. In nature we have shapes, but before having these real things, there were laws that formed them. How did the cosmos co­me about? Because there were laws. There was no beginning. They say there must have been a God, Our Lord, shaping things. No, there were laws.
 
Couldn't you then say that the laws are God?
I’d rather say that it is nature. We believe that objects were created, but it was the law that created them.
 
And couldn't you say that the core of nature is reached through geometry? And that art reveals this core to nature?
I think so, through geometry the core of nature is reached. And art reveals this identity, this relationship between the law and the object.
 
20
Set08

A Natureza da/na Arte

Laura Afonso

 

 
Texto de Paula Monteiro
 
In Revista «Villas & Golfe», Junho/Julho de 2008
 
 
Desde o círculo vermelho que pintou, aos 4 anos, na parede branca da casa dos pais, Nadir Afonso pressen­tiu, e agora sente e sabe, que é na geometria, nas leis matemáticas, que está a essência da obra de arte. Quando um artista pinta, diz o Mestre, ele «representa essas leis matemáticas que estão na natureza, embora não tenha disso consciência».
Do seu percurso - tanto apreciável nas obras de arte realizadas como analisável nos diversos livros anele expõe asuateoria sobre a criação artística - fazem parte diversas experimentações, pois a arte é uma «procura que se faz experimentando». Arquitecto por acaso, inevitável e intrinsecamente pintor, Nadir Afonso continua na demanda da harmonia, essa lei que rege a arte, habitante das insubstituíveis e indestrutíveis leis matemáticas da geometria. Como estas leis são naturais c cosmológicas, através da geometria alcança-se o íntimo da natureza, revelando a arte, segundo o Mestre, «a relação entre a lei e o objecto».
 
 
Aos 4 anos pintou um círculo na parede da sala dos seus pais. O que acha que o levou a pintar essa forma geométrica, geometria que marcou a SUA obra pictórica posterior?
Tinha 4 anos, tratou-se de algo irreflectido. Se há alguma relação com o meu trabalho posterior, não sei explicar. Achei que era uma figura bonita e interessante - no branco da parede, o círculo vermelho sobressaía. Mas não fui mais além do que isso. A reflexão aparece agora. E talvez possa chegar a uma conclusão - devia haver, no subconsciente, uma atracção, que eu já sentia nessa altura, pelas figuras geométricas.
 
Afirmou que «um quadro versa certas leis, leis de composi­ção, que são leis que estão na matemática e essas leis são imutáveis». A que leis se refere?
São as leis da matemática. As leis da matemática são imu­táveis: 2 + 2 = 4 em qualquer parte. Ainda que nunca tivesse existido um círculo ou um quadrado, a lei em si existe, é pré­-existente. O Homem foi atraído por essa geometria, uma geometria latente. As leis do círculo, do quadrado, do tetraedro, todas elas são insubstituíveis c existem mesmo se o objecto nunca tivesse existido.
 
E um pintor, ao pintar, procura representar essas leis?
Procura, ainda que não tenha disso consciência. E normalmente não tem. O artista diz: «Não tenho nada a ver com a geometria. Eu exprimo na minha obra o meu mundo interior». Isto é fal­so. O artista pensa que é o seu mundo interior que ele exprime na sua obra, quando o que ele faz é ir buscar leis que estão na natureza. Ele exprime essas leis porque as sente sem as compreender.
 
Pode-se então dizer que Arte é uma equação que precisa ser desenvolvida mentalmente e cuja solução não está, necessariamente, no mundo visível?
Não é visível. A geometria não é um fenómeno dizível. Não posso definir as leis da obra de arte, nem as leis do cosmos, mas posso senti-las. Insisto nisto porque é muito importante: o artista emprega essas leis porque as sente, mas não as compreende.
E por isso vemos os artistas a não estarem de acordo comigo, e muito menos os estetas. Porque as coisas não são reflectidas, não atingem o nível da consciência. Passam-se ao nível da intuição e não da consciência.
 
A sua experiência com o círculo vermelho na sala e posterior evolução pareciam ditar que estaria nas Belas-Artes a sua for­mação. Qual foi o acaso que ditou a inscrição em arquitectura?
Fui para arquitectura porque fui solicitado por agentes ex­teriores. Quando cheguei às Belas-Artes do Porto, levava um re­querimento para me inscrever em Pintura. Mas quando lá entrei, encontrei um funcionário que estava lá dormitando. Disse-lhe que queria inscrever-me em pintura. Ele puxa pelo requerimento e diz: «Oh homem, então o senhor tem o curso dos liceus e vai-se inscrever em pintura?! O senhor vai para arquitectura!». Naquele tempo, há 60 e tal anos, não cabia na cabeça de ninguém que quem possuísse o curso dos liceus fosse para pintura, pois bas­tava ter a instrução primária para seguir pintura.
Eu, cobardemente, com os meus 18 anos, rasguei o meu re­querimento para pintura e fiz outro para arquitectura. E lá fui eu para arquitectura, empurrado por essa opinião de um funcionário. Mas fiz mal, porque eu só fui pintor. Nunca fui arquitecto. Fiz o curso, mas nunca me senti arquitecto.
 
Continua a defender que a arquitectura não é uma arte, como o fez na sua tese de licenciatura?
Sempre tentei compreender as leis que regem a arte e as leis que regem a arquitectura. As leis que regem a arte são as leis da harmonia, as leis matemáticas da geometria. A arquitectura não precisa de responder a essas leis, é uma disciplina que procura a funcionalidade. Um bom arquitecto não anda atrás das leis da harmonia, mas sim das leis da perfeição, que são leis da nature­za, como as da harmonia, mas que têm uma fonte diferente.
 
Mas então qual é a distinção que o Mestre estabelece en­tre harmonia e perfeição?
As qualidades estão ambas na natureza - o espírito do Homem não faz mais do que apreender essas qualidades. A har­monia é de fonte matemática, não obedece a uma lei de fun­cionalidade. Se o objecto, pela sua função, responde às leis da perfeição, não está relacionado com as leis da harmonia. A perfeição, a qualidade do objecto cuja função responde à necessidade do sujeito. O artista procura e a lei de harmonia. Quando um pintor pinta anda atrás das leis da harmonia.
 
Apesar da ida para arquitectura ter sido fruto de uma selecção aleatória e de não se sentir feliz com a SUA escolha, teve qualidade suficiente para trabalhar com Le Corbusier e com Óscar Niemeyer. Como se deram estes felizes acasos?
 Foi uma coincidência puramente social. Fui para Paris um pouco atraído pela harmonia das formas, pela arte. Mas depois tive a necessidade de trabalhar, tive de fazer arquitectura Já tinha o diploma de arquitecto, precisava de trabalhar, de ganhar dinheiro e fiz arquitectura durante muitos anos E resolvi ba­ter à porta de Le Corbusier porque achei que seria mais inte­ressante, porque ele também era pintor. Foi esse um dos factores que me 1evou a escolher Le Corbusier. Em relação ao Óscar Niemeyer, também trabalhei lá por acaso e o facto de ter tra­balhado com o Le Corbusier ajudou a que eu trabalhasse no atelier do Niemeyer. Mas estas são questões de carácter social, de necessidade de subsistência, que nada têm a ver com a minha ambição de pintar.
 
O percurso da SUA estética, iniciado com o fascínio do geo­métrico com o círculo vermelho, passou pelo expressio­nismo, pelo surrealismo, pela figuração humana, sobretudo feminina, pela arte cinética, tendo quase que regressado ao princípio, com o abstraccionismo geométrico. O que ditou este percurso?
Isso passa-se um pouco no subconsciente. Uma pessoa é in­fluenciada. A determinada altura fui atraído pela pintura de Max Ernst. Às vezes era levado a procurar isto ou aquilo. Por exemplo, quando vi a pintura de Victor Vasarely, pensei «para aqui é que vai a arte». Passei também a procurar a geometria pura. Há coisas que nós, pouco a pouco, vamos apreendendo No início da minha carreira de pintor, não pensava, como pensei mais tar­de ou como penso hoje, que a essência da obra de arte está na matemática. Inicialmente pensava que na obra de arte há pre­ferência do artista pela perfeição dos objectos Só muito mais tarde cheguei à conclusão que a perfeição não tinha nada a ver com a arte - posso fazer imperfeição e fazer arte. Foi um tra­balho lento, duro, de longos anos, que me levou à conclusão que a essência da obra de arte está na matemática A arte no fundo é isso - um indivíduo anda a tactear, procura as coisas ex­perimentando.
 
Para lá da SUA obra pictórica, tem escrito diversos livros nos quais explica as características da criação artística. O que determina esta criação? Porque consegue o artista captar essas formas puras, nem que seja inconscientemente?
É o trabalho de longos anos que faz com que o artista comece a sentir essas leis. Trabalhando as formas, o Homem é tra­balhado por elas. Trabalhando, o artista vai sentindo, pouco a pouco, a harmonia que existe nas formas e depois emprega essa harmonia na sua obra. E há uma coisa curiosa. Hoje tenho 87 anos. Estou muito mais decrépito agora do que estava há 50 anos, há 30 e mesmo há 10 anos. Já não sou o mesmo homem. Tenho dificuldade em compreender certas coisas. Mas a minha sensibilidade está mais desperta à harmonia das formas do que anteriormente. A sensibilidade aumentou.
Às vezes pego num quadro meu que já não via, por exemplo, há 50 anos, olho para ele e sinto que o quadro está errado num determinado local. Mas está errado ou não está errado?
Sinto que ao quadro falta, por exemplo, um quadrado. Mas es­tá ou não está lá o quadrado? Não tenho a certeza.
Se fizermos uma conta do tipo 2 + 2 = 4, não precisa de lá estar o 4. Esta igualdade, por si, i.e., o 2 + 2, já me dá o 4. No quadro é a mesma coisa. Um quadrado ali, mais um triângulo acolá – o equilíbrio do quadro em si, com aquelas formas reais, dá-me a certeza que num ponto x falta qualquer coisa, que não sei se está ou não está, mas que é a súmula de tudo o que lá es­tá -, eu sinto a lei. Se tenho em mim a faculdade de apreender a lei através das formas concretas, posso ver uma forma concreta sentindo lei. Há um fenómeno na natureza que a filosofia desconhece: a lei pode-nos mostrar o objecto sem que o objecto lá esteja. Aquilo que existe na natureza foi gerado por leis ao ponto da lei, por si, gerar objectos. Na natureza temos formas, mas antes de haver estas coisas concretas, havia as leis que as formaram. Como é que nasceu o cosmos? Porque havia leis. Não houve um início. Dizemos que deve ter havido um Deus, Nosso Senhor, a formar as coisas. Não, havia as leis.
 
Pode-se então dizer que as leis são Deus?
Prefiro dizer que é a natureza. Nós pensamos que os objectos foram criados, mas foi a própria lei que os gerou.
 
E poder-se-á dizer que é através da geometria que se alcança o íntimo da natureza?
Acho que sim, através da geometria alcança-se o íntimo da natureza. E a arte revela essa identidade, essa relação entre a lei e o objecto.
 
           
 

Sobre mim

foto do autor

Pesquisar

Sigam-me

Subscrever por e-mail

A subscrição é anónima e gera, no máximo, um e-mail por dia.

Comentários recentes

  • Laura Afonso

    Centro de Artes Nadir Afonso em Boticas

  • Anónimo

    E estas chávenas podem ser adquiridas onde? :)

  • Anónimo

    Gostaria de saber se tem mais imagens sobre os IV ...

  • Laura Afonso

    Sim, divindade egípcia, Thot ou Thoth

  • Mario Ricca

    Será THOTH , a divindade egípcia ?

Links

Autobiografia_Nadir Afonso

Blogs

Sites Nadir Afonso

Links

blog.com.pt

Arquivo

    1. 2019
    2. J
    3. F
    4. M
    5. A
    6. M
    7. J
    8. J
    9. A
    10. S
    11. O
    12. N
    13. D
    1. 2018
    2. J
    3. F
    4. M
    5. A
    6. M
    7. J
    8. J
    9. A
    10. S
    11. O
    12. N
    13. D
    1. 2017
    2. J
    3. F
    4. M
    5. A
    6. M
    7. J
    8. J
    9. A
    10. S
    11. O
    12. N
    13. D
    1. 2016
    2. J
    3. F
    4. M
    5. A
    6. M
    7. J
    8. J
    9. A
    10. S
    11. O
    12. N
    13. D
    1. 2015
    2. J
    3. F
    4. M
    5. A
    6. M
    7. J
    8. J
    9. A
    10. S
    11. O
    12. N
    13. D
    1. 2014
    2. J
    3. F
    4. M
    5. A
    6. M
    7. J
    8. J
    9. A
    10. S
    11. O
    12. N
    13. D
    1. 2013
    2. J
    3. F
    4. M
    5. A
    6. M
    7. J
    8. J
    9. A
    10. S
    11. O
    12. N
    13. D
    1. 2012
    2. J
    3. F
    4. M
    5. A
    6. M
    7. J
    8. J
    9. A
    10. S
    11. O
    12. N
    13. D
    1. 2011
    2. J
    3. F
    4. M
    5. A
    6. M
    7. J
    8. J
    9. A
    10. S
    11. O
    12. N
    13. D
    1. 2010
    2. J
    3. F
    4. M
    5. A
    6. M
    7. J
    8. J
    9. A
    10. S
    11. O
    12. N
    13. D
    1. 2009
    2. J
    3. F
    4. M
    5. A
    6. M
    7. J
    8. J
    9. A
    10. S
    11. O
    12. N
    13. D
    1. 2008
    2. J
    3. F
    4. M
    5. A
    6. M
    7. J
    8. J
    9. A
    10. S
    11. O
    12. N
    13. D
    1. 2007
    2. J
    3. F
    4. M
    5. A
    6. M
    7. J
    8. J
    9. A
    10. S
    11. O
    12. N
    13. D